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Welcome to DSA′s home on the web!

The Darien Soccer Association is dedicated to providing our youth players with an enjoyable and educational athletic experience.  We provide players of all skill levels a structure built around sportsmanship, dedication and individual development.

 Please make our website your first stop for any questions you may have.

 

HEADLINES  Subscribe to Darien Soccer Association RSS news feed.
Practice Times have changed due to Limited Daylight Hrs
10/16/2017
Please note that practice times have been adjusted for the rest of...
DeNunzio picked to play in All-American Game
10/14/2017
We’d like to take a moment to acknowledge and congratulate...
Thank you! Coaches Classic, Darien win 3-2
10/07/2017
  What a great night!  Thanks to all those who...
Youth Soccer Referees Need Support-Not Harassment
10/07/2017
"Youth soccer referees arguably have one of the toughest officiating...
Sports Safety Lecture Series- YMCA/ONS
09/28/2017
Darien YMCA and ONS Sports Medicine host youth sports safety lecture...
 
Practice Times have changed due to Limited Daylight Hrs

Please note that practice times have been adjusted for the rest of the Season starting today October 16th.   Practices are 4-5pm or 5-6pm for all programs due to the limited daylight hours.  You can view your team's exact schedule on the TEAM PAGE.  


by posted 10/16/2017
DeNunzio picked to play in All-American Game

We’d like to take a moment to acknowledge and congratulate our Senior Captain Emiliy DeNunzio on a great achievement and a first in Blue Wave Girls’ Soccer history.

 

Emily is one of three FCIAC players to be selected to participate in the High School All-American Game. Forty of the nation’s elite girls high school soccer players will take part in the High School All-American Game on December 2, 2017 in Orlando, FL. The players selected are seniors who have finished their high school careers and represent their high school teams during the fall season. These players have achieved many regional and national awards and will attend some of the top universities across the country. The last time a FCIAC player was selected to play in this game was 2011, it is a credit to the effort and time Emily has put into the game of soccer. 

 

Please see attached article below and once again CONGRTULTONS Emily.

http://www.fciac.net/901884/three-fciac-girls-soccer-players-selected-to-high-school-all-american-game/

 

Please come support the Blue Wave Girls Soccer team this Tuesday evening 10/17 for senior night 5:30pm under the lights DHS stadium field.

 

Leigh Parsons

Blue Wave Girls Soccer


by posted 10/14/2017
Thank you! Coaches Classic, Darien win 3-2

 

What a great night!  Thanks to all those who came out to support our local soccer programs and raise money for Americares. 

Goals by Linda (U11 Girls), Ross Stride (U13 Boys) and Jorge Zubillaga (Club Excel) were enough to hold off a new canaan side by 3-2.  A nice assist by Jhonny Arteaga (U10 Boys) and great defense by Sebastian (U15 Girls) and Diego Barahona (Club Excel) helped Darien with the win.  Oscar (U9 Boys/U12 Boys) was spectacular in goal.

Thanks to all our coaches who participated last night:

Jon Bradley

Liam Witham

Jhonny Arteaga

Oscar

John Ruddock

Linda Velaj

Ross Stride

Chris Flaherty

Sebastian

Adam Duarte

Furtuna Velaj

Diego Barahona

Luka Ivanovic

Jorge Zubilaga

Jonny Mcadam

Chris Puente


by posted 10/07/2017
Youth Soccer Referees Need Support-Not Harassment

"Youth soccer referees arguably have one of the toughest officiating jobs in comparison with basketball, football, baseball, or hockey officials..."

 

“Call it both ways!!”
“You’re blind!!”
“Blow your whistle!!”
“Open your eyes!!”
“You need glasses!!”

Do these phrases sound familiar? They probably do if you’re a referee, or if you’re a parent trying to enjoy your child’s soccer game on the sidelines.

Contempt and disrespect towards game officials continues to plague both sidelines, from disgruntled spectators who feel that everything is being called against their team; to screaming coaches who seem to have a better view from 60 yards away.

Needless to say, there is a very high probability that the majority of these “sideline officials” have never bothered to take a referee class, or made an attempt to read the Laws of the Game.

Being a sports referee is not an easy task; it is something that requires concentration, patience, excellent communication skills, fitness, and most of all judgement based on the rules of the sport. It is this judgement that usually comes under extreme criticism often regardless of the level of competition.

Youth soccer referees arguably have one of the toughest officiating jobs in comparison with basketball, football, baseball, or hockey officials. This is due to the number of players involved (assuming an 11v11 game), the large area to cover, the continuous action, and the split second decisions which are usually correct only 50% of the time based on sideline remarks.

Given these circumstances, one would think that both coaches and spectators would be more understanding when a call is either missed or judged incorrectly.

Youth soccer leagues all over the country lose referees, especially young referees, every year due to harassment and intimidation from spectators and coaches. Once the shouting and crude remarks aimed at officials begins from the sidelines, it is certainly to be followed by the players on the field.

Referees are not perfect and even though some may be assigned to officiate a game above their ability, no one deserves to be verbally or physically abused. Parents have a responsibility to teach their children the importance of being respectful to a person in authority, and in a soccer game, the referee is that person; regardless whether it is a 13-year old or a more senior person.Copy of Register for the upcoming Webinar (1)

It is time for youth soccer leagues all over the country to take a stand against referee abuse, especially when the target is a young official.

I propose that leagues require persistent offenders (parent or coach), those individuals who consistently yell at referees, to become certified and work several games before being allowed to return to the field as a spectator. Another suggestion is to implement a parent education program that requires parents to attend a preseason meeting where sideline behavior is addressed; including a no tolerance policy towards referee abuse.

One other idea is to have parents officiate in-house games at the youngest ages where results really do not matter; this may even encourage them to work more competitive games. The more parents can see the challenges associated with refereeing, the more understanding they will hopefully be when, as spectators, a call does not go their way.

Ideas as those mentioned above may not lead to a large inflow of officials but it might result in the recruitment of a few new officials for your league; not to mention the possible removal of a screaming parent from the sideline. If further encouragement is needed, consider the following reasons for becoming a referee:

  • Only job you’ll have where you’re the boss once you show up.
  • Better understanding of the game.
  • If you’re a parent of a child who travels frequently to out of state tournaments, it is a magnificent way to cover your travel expenses; including mileage, hotel, and meals. Most tournaments are always in need of referees and are willing to cover some or most of these expenses.
  • Great way to save for the holidays or a family vacation if you’re a parent.
  • Excellent pay for kids and an perfect way to learn the game from a different perspective

Could your soccer league function without referees? Probably not!

It is critical for leagues to encourage its membership to learn all sides of the game. So next time you reach your boiling point at a game due to what you consider to be poor officiating, ask yourself the following questions,

“Would I be yelling if my child or other family member was the referee?”
“Can I do better?”

I would like to say that in most cases, the answer to the first question is most likely “NO”, but as we all know, there are always exceptions to the rule.

If the answer to the second question is “YES” and you are not currently a certified official, then make sure to register for the next referee class, purchase the necessary uniforms and accessories, and become part of the solution.

If the answer is “NO”, then do us all a favor and just keep your mouth closed.


by posted 10/07/2017
Sports Safety Lecture Series- YMCA/ONS

Darien YMCA and ONS Sports Medicine
host youth sports safety lecture series
in October


The Darien YMCA in partnership with Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS) is hosting a series of lectures on topics surrounding youth sports safety. These lectures are designed to give parents, caregivers, and coaches the tools they need to help young athletes stay healthy and safe while participating in activities they enjoy. These free lectures will be held at the Darien Y every Tuesday in October from 7-8pm.

On October 3rd ONS Sports Medicine Specialist Dr. Marc Kowalsky will lead a discussion on “The dangers of sports specialization.” Dr. Kowalsky will discuss strategies to protect young athletes from burnout and season-ending injuries that may affect them well into adulthood.

 

Next, on October 10th ONS Sports Medicine Specialist Dr. Demetris Delos will explore “The Healthy Athlete.” Dr. Delos will outline the nutritional and sleep requirements for competitive student athletes of all ages and the dangerous growth in performance enhancing substance abuse among youth.

Then on October 17th ONS Neurosurgeon Dr. Scott Simon will discuss the signs and treatments for the concussed athlete during “Is it a Concussion?” ONS Athletic Trainer Pete Falla will join the discussion and outline concussion assessment tests and ways for student athletes to avoid sitting out the rest of the game.

Lastly, on October 24th Dr. Katherin Vadasdi, MD, Director of the ONS Women’s Sports Medicine Center will go in depth on “Women’s Sports Medicine: Understanding the role gender plays in sports injury.” Alicia Hirscht, PT, Director of ONS Physical Therapy/Stamford will be on hand to demonstrate injury prevention exercises.

There is no cost to attend a lecture but reservations are required. Attendees will receive a free guest pass to the Darien Y.   Please RSVP by emailing balfredo@onsmd.com or jvansciver@darien-ymca.org.


by posted 09/28/2017
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